Ubuntu One Music Store: Better be using a real CD retailer.

Last time, I covered a review on Ubuntu One. Ubuntu One is great for cloud storage and backups, but their newly introduced music store is not just good, it’s actually bad. The prices vary per track from 0.50$-2$, and the bitrate is the highest you can get. Tracks will be send to ‘.ubuntuone\Purchased from Ubuntu One’ in your personal folder.

The music store doesn’t have much tracks available, even great artists like U2 or Duran Duran aren’t widely available in their store. The advantages are, though, their music does not contain DRM or any other security and can be easily send to your MP3 player.25GB

At the time of writing, they have a special offer that made me try this new service and it was very hard to find music I liked. They accept major credit cards as the only payment option, so people in the EU are probably already stuck. I do have a Visa credit card, so this wasn’t a problem for me.
I bought a track for €0.79, and the +20GB storage and 6 months free unlimited music streaming for iDevices and Android were instantly activated. This concept is absolutely great, but not yet the solution for piracy: it simply doesn’t have a wide choice to choose from if you’re a real music geek.

I’m not saying this is the definitive solution for anything, because it’s simply too new. Who knows, it will be popular some day. But there are many things that require some tweaking.

 

Ubuntu1 – Useful for multiboot – Less for Windows

Ubuntu One, a cloud service by Canonical which servers you 5GB free ‘cloud’ storage. This isn’t very new, but Ubuntu One can be used on almost any OS, such as Mac OS, Linux/Ubuntu, Windows, Android and i-Devices (iPod, iPhone etc.). Very straightforward, and the server speeds are pretty high, and it’s a useful way to (automatically) sync your files.

Even though the advertising is great, the website works great, but the sync-daemon for Windows is pretty unstable. Sometimes it uploads files, sometimes it doesn’t (at the time of writing).  This was the first thing I noticed on both Windows 7 and Windows 8 Pro.

Ubuntu One works like a charm, and supports any operating system. 5GB doesn’t look much, but they have a pretty nice referral program for extra storage. Of course, the version for Android and Ubuntu work great. I didn’t tested the Mac OS X version, but I hope it doesn’t fail like the Windows version. It’s pretty nice when you realize this was once upon a time some small scale project (Ubuntu) and grew just like Apple or Microsoft. Combine it with some Wine and you will have a pretty OS with many, many options.

Ubuntu One in Windows
Ubuntu One in Windows

 

Most people think that 5GB is worthless and too low. Well that’s true if you synchronize your Documents folder. But even when you want it free, use the referral program. Or pay just $3/month. It’s worth it — let’s hope they’ll develop the Windows version to something more stable.

Well, it’s plain and simple and anyone should be able to use it. Because that’s their goal eventually: ease of use and free to anyone.

Also check out the new Thunderbird integration for Ubuntu One included in the lastest versions. It automatically uploads attachments that are above the file limit for your mail server.